Homelessness

One-fifth of Transgender and Gender-Variant people report being homeless at some point in their lives.

Coming out often leaves Transgender and Gender-Variant Canadians in a situation where their economic status is in the hands of people who are actively discriminating against them, people who may be unwilling to hire them or rent to them. Family members may choose to evict them. They may also be put into situations where they have to choose between personal safety and shelter. Youth in the community are particularly at risk. As well, many homeless shelters discriminate against members of the Transgender and Gender-Variant communities, or will outright stop them accessing services.

Much of what is being done to combat homelessness and poverty in the Transgender and Gender-Variant communities is being done by members of those communities pulling together to create support networks, like the Saige Community Food Bank on the East Side of Vancouver, an organization that provides safe and inclusive service for Transgender and Gender-Variant people in need. Saige also has a community kitchen. One way people can show support for members of the Transgender and Gender-Variant communities who are faced with homelessness is to support the Saige Community Food Bank, either by donating food or time. Saige, like many of the services offered to the Transgender and Gender-Variant communities, is entirely volunteer, and relies on support from community members.